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something in your eye?

 
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Jeanette Lewis



Joined: 13 Oct 2009
Posts: 595
Location: Merseyside U.K.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:37 am    Post subject: something in your eye? Reply with quote

Hi all,
I caught up with one of my sisters over Christmas who had just returned from Italy - she said she cried over one of Botticellis paintings because she felt overwhelmed by the beauty and colour.
I recently had a moment like this when I was restoring a carved wooden statue of St. Anthony from the Stuffleser studio.
To think that someone could make something so beautiful from just a hunk of wood ... the face was gorgeous...it moved me to tears.
So come on, has a work of art ever moved you to tears? (and not just because the clay dried out!)
If so , what was it - or was that just something in your eye. Very Happy
Jeanette
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Lori



Joined: 11 Jan 2008
Posts: 264
Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a different reaction - one that horrifies my teen daughter. I become so overwhelmed with love and delight that I both shed a few tears and grin like an idiot and even clap my hands in applause because I'm so happy and moved by something Wink

Stupid and silly, I know, but an honest reaction to a moment and a heartfelt action of gratitude to the creator (both of them).
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Lori Kiplinger Pandy
www.kiplingerpandy.com
http://lorikiplingerpandy.blogspot.com/
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Stuart



Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Posts: 834

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a sculpture or a painting, but certainly a creation..................standing in the middle of the Brooklyn Bridge facing out towards the statue of Liberty, and being thoroughly overcome by the sheer enormity of it all, and the sense of what it must have stood for........for all those who arrived searching for a new life in times past. Thoroughly overcome.
Stuart
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Jeanette Lewis



Joined: 13 Oct 2009
Posts: 595
Location: Merseyside U.K.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for those honest admissions,
Stuart and Lori,
how nice to hear that there are sensitive souls about !
What a wonderful moment Stuart, reminded me of a time I was overcome by a much smaller natural wonder...visiting Malta(?)for the first time and sharing a small rowing boat with some tourists to visit a "blue grotto".
I blubbed my head off because until then I didn't know water could be that clear or that blue. ( well, I do live near the River Mersey..) fantastic!
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Stuart



Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Posts: 834

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 11:12 am    Post subject: Come on Toby Reply with quote

I'm sure you can shed a good tear with the best of them??? :cry:
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Alison Belt



Joined: 19 Feb 2011
Posts: 201
Location: Baltimore, MD

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michelangelo's drawings did that for me. I didn't cry, but I go into an almost trancelike state where the only thing I see is the picture and nothing else around me. It's so wonderful to be able to experience that.
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Michael Norwood



Joined: 18 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: Southwest Arkansas

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps not shed a tear, but I have certainly felt Stendhal's syndrome set in while gazing upon a Bernini sculpture or a painting by Raphael or Rembrandt.


Mike
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Glenn Terry



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 54
Location: Minneapolis area, MN

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Again, not tears, but just as moving. As a child, the Evanston (Illinois) Public library had an orginal 1897 Bouguereau painting, "At the Fountain" hanging in its stairwell. Even with poor lighting I was always deeply moved by it and in the first decade of my life would stare at it like it was a holy icon.

When I discovered at age 29 that I had the talent to sculpt, I looked for the best training I could find and was led to an Atelier which taught drawing and painting. They had Bouguereau posters on the walls. In the 70's and 80's when realism had been neglected by the "artelligensia", I had forgotten about him and suddenly it was like a wonderful homecoming. I originally took that training only to become a better sculptor, but later realized I could do both painting and sculpture.

In 1996 "At the Fountain" was hanging with much better lighting, at eye level on the 3rd floor of their newly redesigned library and I drove there to spend 10 very long days painting this copy of it:
http://www.glennterryart.com/?q=node/25

A year later the library sold their original painting through Soethby's for nearly $1 million. I was fortunate to act when I had the opportunity. This painting made a deep impression and was one of many great things about growing up in the Chicago area that helped shape my aesthetic sense.

That is why the work you create for a public setting is so important. Children especially learn from patterns in their environment, and internalize these. I am grateful to Bouguereau, St. Gaudens, D. C. French, and the many others who have served the cause of anchoring light and love in the visual evironment.
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Stuart



Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Posts: 834

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 4:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nicely put Glenn!
I had a similar experience with a print of Constable's Haywain, that was in the hall at my Grandparents in N Yorkshire.
With no personal access to artists or art at that time in the 50s, I used to wonder who these people were who created such wonderful paintings??
Didn't stop me drawing though!
S
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Jeanette Lewis



Joined: 13 Oct 2009
Posts: 595
Location: Merseyside U.K.

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Glenn,
I was never taught history of art - well nothing you could write home about. ( another thing the artelligencia neglected!) so I always welcome discovering paintings new to me. Thanks for showing us that lovely copy.
And for people like me Michael, an explanation of stendhals syndrome ...(so thats what its called !) Very Happy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal_syndrome
jeanette
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